How To Handle Dementia Patients

staff writer
How To Handle Dementia Patients

The activities for daily living as simple as eating will be a struggle for both the patient and the caregiver. Dementia is an advancing mental disorder that hinders the patient to think clearly thus resulting in moody and crazy actions. The result of these irritating gestures will depend on how a person reacts to them. Playing it cool and trying to do the right thing will frequently drive you to exhaustion because the debate will be endless. The trick is in being able to make the patient relax. How to handle dementia patients will bring you to another world.

Voluntarily entering the world of madness might sound bizarre to many people, but it helps a lot in retaining your own sanity when caring for such an individual. Do not resist the patient’s sudden swing of emotions. Instead, be flexible in going along. If you can’t beat them, might as well join them. You might have fun doing it. Do not let your own emotions ruin you. Here are suggestions how to deal with them to be a better caregiver:

  1. Don’t be too hard on yourself. The feelings of guilt will be devastating when you see a loved one losing their memory. Regretting not giving your best to your loved one before their condition developed is depressing. Move forward and be thankful instead that you are given the opportunity to take care of the person when he or she is not capable of doing it anymore. You can only do so much, and you are doing your best.

  2. Find some time to manage anger frustration. When you feel that you are treated so unfairly by other family members who are leaving you with the responsibility of being the sole caregiver for the patient, do something about it. Do not let frustrations build up. Get a volunteer or hire a substitute caregiver at least once or twice a week so that you can have time for yourself.

  3. Feeling alone in handling the responsibility in caring for the patient will drive you to loneliness. You will also end up grieving because of the burdens laid upon your shoulders. Do not allow yourself to be alone with the patient for a very long time. Invite friends and family members to visit, or bring the patient to visit other people to at least change your environment to keep things positive.

  4. Seek for outside resources for help. Dementia is nothing to be ashamed of. It can happen to anybody. You just have deal with it when it affects a family member. Openness to any support groups will give you the flexibility to deal with the situation. Learning from the experiences of others can make you more proactive with people offering help.

  5. The reality is already there.  Staying positive all the time will lead you to possible solutions to the problems that you are encountering on a daily basis. Believing that your best intentions will bear fruit someday is essential to avoid burnout. Maintain a healthy diet and do not neglect exercise. You can face difficult arrangements better when your body and mind are up for it.

  6. Share your experiences with the patient. He or she may not be able to respond properly, but the communication can lighten your burdens. Do things that you normally do with a child like telling family stories while flipping through the family album. Play some songs that will make the patient happy. You will definitely enjoy the process in the long run.

How to handle dementia patients is tough, but there’s a way around it. You may have to lie once in a while so as not to create friction. Know that this is not an offense. You are a great person who only wants the best for a loved one with dementia.

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