Ways & How

How To Replace Double Hung Windows

How To Replace Double Hung Windows

Double hung windows, just like the other types of window, serve as one of the best aesthetic elements of the entire house. These windows have two (2) movable sashes – usually hung one over the other. These sashes are connected to a spring system so that they can be raised and lowered easily. Over time, this spring system can deteriorate due to natural wear and tear, and you may find it a little hard to know how to replace double hung windows on your own, especially if you have never tried doing the job. All you need are the right tools and the procedure down below.

  1. These are the things you will need. First on the list is sash replacement kit. Gather together a pry bar, caulk with caulk gun, level and shims, measuring device, wood scrap, mallet and hammer (claw), screwdriver, exterior seal, sharp knife, and a number of rust-free finishing and roughing nails. Before attempting to replace your double hung windows, place these items near or just within your working area.

  2. Get the old windows’ measurements. Before anything else, make sure that you have measured the top, bottom, middle, width, and the length of the old windows so you can get accurate figures to follow for the replacement windows or new sashes.

  3. Start removing the stops. The so-called window “stops” are actually the pieces that keep the sashes secured and in place. On the first stop, take off the sash cord on one side and then tie it carefully before taking off the other sash cord so that the counterweight will not crash down. On the next stop, take off the other sash the cord. After successfully setting aside the sashes, untie the knots made earlier, and slowly lower the counterweight on the wall surface.

    On each side of your window, find way to connect vinyl-jamb liners along with screws. On the head-jamb, replace the wood-parting stop. Before you load the exterior sash, you have to pull the jamb-liner’s outer sash down. As for the interior sash, repeat the process until you are able to replace the inner stops.

  4. Take out the 1st sash. Start by prying off on the window’s molding which can either be quarter-round, shoe molding, or a thin strip of wood. After that, notice that the base sash will now be capable of swinging out of the frame and into the room, so that you can remove it slowly. Be extra careful not to allow the counterweight to suddenly fall to the floor. If it makes noise, don’t panic.

  5. Take out the 2nd sash. This is the harder sash. Removing this part may take a little longer because of the divider strip in between the sashes. The divider strip is normally stuck tightly. Once this strip is taken out, the 2nd sash will be easily removed like the base sash.

  6. Take out the wood fill, if there is any. Should the fill remain, use your level and your shims so that you will have a square frame on your new window. Look at the jamb, and if there are decayed and rotted portions, fill them. You can also put epoxy on the other decayed parts.

    If your new window has a flange, simply tack it using roughing nails beginning at the outer part of your house. If it is merely an insert, install it from the interior part of the house by simply tilting it from the base.

  7. Insert shims and jamb. While the shims have to be inserted in between the frame, the jamb must be installed from the interior so that it will keep the frame square of your new window. To permanently attach the new window onto the jamb portion, use finishing nails. While caulking the frame, use sealer tape to serve as moisture barrier around the exterior of your new window. Now you can reinstall the exterior trim and caulk the edges. The siding cover must also be replaced. Use a knife to trim the shims. Replace the inner sash stops and the inner trim on your new window.

Double hung windows are unique in style; so many homeowners prefer using them. These windows, when properly installed and fully operational, are capable of bringing air inside during summer days and can be easily closed whenever storms and rain are around. Truly, learning how to replace double hung windows is challenging. Even so, it is still a kind of home-improvement activity you can learn all by yourself. You don’t need a pro to do it for you.

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